Spinosaurus

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Learn more about Spinosaurus

Quick Facts
NameSpinosaurus
Diet
Weight6000 kilos
Length15 meters
Height5 meters
Period
Spinosaurus
Human

Spinosaurus lived about 100 million years ago during the Middle Cretaceous period in what is now North Africa. It belonged to the Spinosauridae family, known from incomplete fossils from North Africa. Spinosaurus is a type of carnivorous dinosaur. 

In 1915, Ernst Stromer gave Spinosaurus a scientific name, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus meaning "spiny lizard," because of its large flat dorsal spines, which grew more than 1.5 meters (5 feet) long. 

Spinosaurus was big. How big, exactly? Scientists estimated that it had been between 7 and 20 tons.

Spinosaurus had been able to swim and probably had pressure sensors on their snout to detect potential prey moving in the water like fish. They also ate small dinosaurs and are believed to be scavengers as they also ate dead dinosaurs. They walked on two legs, and were a fast predator.

How many teeth does a Spinosaurus have?

Spinosaurus had six or seven needle-like teeth similar to those of crocodiles and another 12 teeth behind the upper jaw. It also had a few large, sloping teeth that interlocked at the end of the snout, and none of the teeth were serrated. 

Why was the spinosaurus so big?

Spinosaurs possibly grew so large because they also eat larger prey such as piscivores. Since they can swim, they also had the opportunity to hunt sharks, crocodiles, pterosaurs and fish. 

What was unique about the spinosaurus

The unique spines of Spinosaurus on the back, which grew more than 1.5 meters long.

Why does the Spinosaurus have a backbone?

Spinosaurus is one of the spectacular carnivores of the Middle Cretaceous period. And during their existence, the spines helped them appear even larger to intimidate other carnivores, attract mates, and some believe the spine was used to help keep them calm. 

Is Spinosaurus bigger than Tyrannosaurus Rex?

The only dinosaur known to be larger than the T-REX is the Spinosaurus. A huge carnivore that walks the earth at 50 feet long. The huge predator with a 3-foot-long jaw full of jagged teeth can rip you to shreds. 

Could the Spinosaurus kill a T Rex?

How many of you have seen Jurassic Park 3, the battle between the Spinosaurus and the T-Rex? 

From the weapons, advantages and disadvantages of each party, we will know who could win between Spinosaurus and T-rex.

Tyrannosaurus had a bite force of about 6.5 tons and had teeth over 60.8 inches long in its 4-foot jaw that could easily tear Spinosaurus into the flesh. However, Spinosaurus had a bite force of about 2 tons, but with its sharp claws it could make cuts of over 2 inches on Tyrannosaurus.

The Tyrannosaurus was more muscular and had better teeth and a stronger bite force that could break the Spinosaurus. They were also smart enough to avoid being killed. The only advantage of the Spinosaurus were their strong arms and sharp claws that could kill the Tyrannosaurus if given many opportunities to attack.

Tyrannosaurus was a little smaller, with weaker arms and smaller claws than Spinosaurus. But the Spinosaurus is not as smart as the T-rex, it had a conical tooth, and the spine of its back can be hit quickly by the T-rex, causing it to lose in battle. 

It's hard to say for sure, but Tyrannosaurus would probably win most of the time because it is muscular and intelligent enough.

Where did they live?

When did they live?

What was your diet?

Who discovered them?

What kind of dinosaurs are they?

What type of species are they?

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geological time 3

Fun Facts

Hi, kids! Here are some fun and exciting facts about Spinosaurus.

 

  • The name Spinosaurus means "spinal lizard".
  • The Spinosaurus is a semi-aquatic animal; it feeds on fish, huge sharks and even crocodiles. 
  • Spinosaurus was the giant dinosaur that walked the earth. 
  • It had distinctive spines on its back that grew more than 1.5 meters long.

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