Styracosaurus

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Quick Facts
NameStyracosaurus
Diet
Weight3000 kilos
Length5.5 meters
Height2 meters
Period
Styracosaurus
Human
The Styracosaurus is a Ceratopsian dinosaur from the Cretaceous period. As a herbivore Styracosaurus during this time could be found eating plants in Canada, USA about 70 million years ago. Styracosaurus was a large dinosaur with an approximate weight of 3,000 kilograms (1364 pounds) and an estimated length of 5.5 meters (19 feet). This large herbivore likely measured 2 meters (7 feet) tall.

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