Mamenchisaurus

To the best of our knowledge images are available by CC.

Learn more about Mamenchisaurus

Quick Facts
NameMamenchisaurus
Diet
Weight27216 kilograms
Length22 meters
Height10.7 meters
Period
Mamenchisaurus
Human

Mamenchisaurus was first discovered in 1952 in Sichuan, China, and was named by Chung Chien Young. It had the longest neck of all known dinosaurs except the newly found Sauroposeidon, which occupies half of its entire body. Mamenchisaurus jingyanensis belonged to the Chinese family. 

Mamenchisaurus lived about 160 to 145 million years ago in the Late Jurassic period, when the Earth was very warm, sea level was high and there was no polar ice. 

Mamenchisaurus was one of the few dinosaurs that took it to the extreme; it had 19 vertebrae in its neck to sweep its neck across a wide area of vegetation without having to walk to continually find new areas physically. Mamenchisaurus was a herbivore and ate a tremendous amount of plant material each day to sustain itself. It had blunt teeth, useful for stripping plants such as pteridophytes, horsetails, club mosses, and ferns.

Mamenchisaurus had been traveling in herds and migrated when its local food supply was depleted. It reproduced by laying eggs. Studies show that this dinosaur never cared for its babies, or even guarded its eggs.

Mamenchisaurus had two brains, and the second one has only an enlargement of the spinal cord in the hip area larger than the animal's small brain. It moved slowly on all fours.

According to Gregory S. Paul, it may have reached 35 m in length and possibly weighed 60-80 tons.

What does mamenchisaurus mean?

Mamenchisaurus was named from the Chinese Pinyin mǎ (马 'horse') and mén (门 'door'), while chi is a transliteration of xī (溪 'stream' or 'brook'), combined with the suffix -saurus (from the Greek sauros meaning 'lizard') to abbreviate 'Mamenchi lizard'."

How tall is a mamenchisaurus?

Mamenchisaurus reached 11 m in height. 

What did the mamenchisaurus eat?

Mamenchisaurus was a herbivore and ate a tremendous amount of plant material every day to sustain itself. It had blunt teeth, useful for stripping plants such as pteridophytes, horsetails, mosses and ferns.

When did Mamenchisaurus live?

Mamenchisaurus lived about 160 to 145 million years ago in the Late Jurassic period, when the Earth was very warm, the sea level was high and there was no polar ice.

Where did they live?

When did they live?

What was your diet?

Who discovered them?

What kind of dinosaurs are they?

What type of species are they?

  • Paul, G.S. (2010). The Princeton Field Guide to DinosaursPrinceton University Press.
  • P. Martin Sander, Andreas Christian, Marcus Clauss, Regina Fechner, Carole T. Gee, Eva-Maria Griebeler, Hanns-Christian Gunga, Jürgen Hummel, Heinrich Mallison, Steven F. Perry, Holger Preuschoft, Oliver W. M. Rauhut, Kristian Remes, Thomas Tütken, Oliver Wings, Ulrich Witzel: Biology of the sauropod dinosaurs: the evolution of gigantism. In: Biological Reviews. Bd. 86, Nr. 1, 2011, ISSN 0006-3231, S. 117-155, doi:10.1111/j.1469-185X.2010.00137.x.
  • Ouyang Hui, Ye Yong: The first mamenchisaurian skeleton with complete skull Mamenchisaurus Youngi. Sichuan Science and Technology Press, Chengdu 2001, ISBN 7-5364-4871-6, S. 90.
  • Paul Upchurch , Paul M. Barrett , Peter Dodson: Sauropoda. In: David B. Weishampel, Peter Dodson, Halszka Osmólska (ed.): The Dinosauria . 2nd ed. University of California Press, Berkeley CA et al.2004 , ISBN 0-520-24209-2 pp. 259-324.
  • Donald F. Glut: Dinosaurs. The Encyclopedia. McFarland, Jefferson NC u. a. 1997, ISBN 0-89950-917-7.
  • Heinrich Mallison: Rearing giants - kinetic/dynamic modeling of sauropod bipedal and tripodal poses. In: P. Martin Sander, Andreas Christian, Marcus Clauss, Regina Fechner, Carole T. Gee, Eva-Maria Griebeler, Hanns-Christian Gunga, Jürgen Hummel, Heinrich Mallison, Steven F. Perry, Holger Preuschoft, Oliver W. M. Rauhut, Kristian Remes, Thomas Tütken, Oliver Wings, Ulrich Witzel (Hrsg.): Biology of the sauropod dinosaurs. Understanding the life of giants. Indiana University Press, Bloomington IN u. a. 2011, ISBN 978-0-253-35508-9, S. 237-250.
  • John S. McIntosh: Sauropoda. In: David B. Weishampel, Peter Dodson, Halszka Osmólska (Hrsg.): The Dinosauria. University of California Press, Berkeley CA u. a. 1990, ISBN 0-520-06726-6, S. 345-401.
  • Young, C. C. 1954. On a new sauropod from Yiping, Szechuan, China. Acta Scientia Sinica, 3, 491-504.
  • Young, C.C., and Zhao, X.-J. (1972). "Mamenchisaurus hochuanensis sp. nov." Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology Monographs, A, 8:1-30.
  • Wedel, M.J., and Cifelli, R.L. (2005). "SauroposeidonOklahoma's native giant." Oklahoma Geology Notes, 65(2): 40-57.
  • Ye, Y.; Ouyang, H.; Fu, Q.-M. (2001). "New material of Mamenchisaurus hochuanensis from Ziging China". Vertebrata PalAsiatica 39 (4): 266-271. 
  • Xing, L; Ye, Y; Shu, C; Peng, G; You, H (2009). "Structure, orientation and finite element analysis of the tail club of Mamenchisaurus hochuanensis.". Acta Geologica Sinica (English Edition) 83 (6): 1031-1040. doi:10.1111/j.1755-6724.2009.00134.x. 
  • Russell, D. A. & Zheng, Z. 1993. A large mamenchisaurid from the Junggar Basin Xinjiang, People's Republic of China. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences,30,2082-2095.
  • "Osteology, paleobiology, and relationships of the sauropod dinosaur. Sauroposeidon", by Mathew J. Wedel, Richard L. Cifelli, and R. Kent Sanders (Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 45, pages 343-388, 2000).
  • Ouyang, H. and Ye, Y. 2002. The First Mamenchisaurian Skeleton with Complete Skull: Mamenchisaurus youngi (in Chinese with English summary). 111 pp + 20 plates. Sichuan Science and Technology Press, Chengdu.
  • He, X.-L., Yang, S.-H., Cai, K.-J. & Liu, Z.-W. 1996. A new species of sauropod Mamenchisaurus anyuensis sp. nov. Proceedings 30th International Geol. Congr., 12, 83-86.
  • Wang, J., Norell, M. A., Pei, R., Ye, Y., & Chang, S.-C. 2019. "Surprisingly young age for the mamenchisaurid sauropods in South China". Cretaceous Research'.
  • Y. Zhang and W. Chen. 1996. Preliminary research on the classification of sauropods from Sichuan Basin, China. In M. Morales (ed.), The Continental Jurassic. Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin 60:97-107.
  • Zhang, Y. & Li, K.1998. A new species of sauropod dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic of Sichuan Basin, China. Journal of Chengdu Institute of Technology, 25, 1, 61-70.
  • Fang, X.S.; Zhao, X.J.; Lu, L.W.; Cheng, Z.W. (2004/01/01) "Discovery of Late Jurassic Mamenchisaurus in Yunnan, southwestern China" 12 Geological Bulletin of China.
  • Origin of the name Mamenchisaurus (in Chinese), Beijing Museum of Natural History website
  • L. P. Tatarinov. 1964. Nadotryad Dinosauria. Dinozavry [Superorder Dinosauria. Dinosaurs]. In Y. A. Orlov (ed.), Osnovy Paleontologii [Fundamentals of Paleontology] 12:523-589.
  • R. Steel. 1970. Part 14. Saurischia. Handbuch der Paläoherpetologie/Encyclopedia of Paleoherpetology. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart 1-87.
  • C.-C. Young and H. C. C. Chao. 1972. [Mamenchisaurus hochuanensis sp. nov.]. Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaeoanthropology Monographs, Series A 8:1-30.
  • J. S. McIntosh. 1990. Species determination in sauropod dinosaurs with tentative suggestions for their classification. In K. Carpenter and P. J. Currie (eds.), Dinosaur Systematics: Perspectives and Approaches, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 53-69.
  • P. Upchurch. 1995. Sauropod phylogeny and palaeoecology. In M. G. Lockley, V. F. dos Santos, C. A. Meyer, & A. P. Hunt (eds.), Aspects of Sauropod Paleobiology. GAIA 10:249-260
  • Paul Upchurch , Paul M. Barrett , Peter Dodson: Sauropoda. In: David B. Weishampel, Peter Dodson, Halszka Osmólska (ed.): The Dinosauria . 2nd ed. University of California Press, Berkeley CA et al.2004 , ISBN 0-520-24209-2 pp. 259-324.
  • J. A. Wilson. 2002. Sauropod dinosaur phylogeny: critique and cladistic analysis. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 136:217-276.
  • X. Zhao. 1983. Phylogeny and evolutionary stages of Dinosauria. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 28(1-2):295-306.
  • Toru Sekiya: Re-examination of Chuanjiesaurus anaensis (Dinosauria: Sauropoda) from the Middle Jurassic Chuanjie Formation, Lufeng County, Yunnan Province, Southwest China. In: Memoir of the Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum. Nr. 10, 2011, ISSN 1347-5622S. 1-54, hier S. 3, Digitalisat (PDF; 6.26).
  • Christian A., Peng G., Sekiya T., Ye Y., Wulf M.G., Steuer T., 2013, "Biomechanical Reconstructions and Selective Advantages of Neck Poses and Feeding Strategies of Sauropods with the Example of. Mamenchisaurus youngi", PLoS ONE 8(10): e71172. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071172.
  • Daniels, C.B., and Pratt, J., 1992, "Breathing in long-necked dinosaurs: did the sauropods have bird lungs?", Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology, A, 101: 43-46
geological time 3

Fun Facts

  • Mamenchisaurus had the longest neck, except for the newly found Sauroposeidon.
  • Mamenchisaurus means "Mamenchi lizard".
  • It was a herbivore.
  • It reproduced by laying eggs.
  • Mamenchisaurus traveled in herds.

More to Explore!

en_USEnglish

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This