Barosaurus

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Quick Facts
NameBarosaurus
Diet
Weight20000 kilos
Length24 meters
Height12 meters
Period
Barosaurus
Human

Barosaurus was an herbivorous dinosaur found in the Carnegie Quarry. It was a giant, long-tailed, long-necked dinosaur closely related to the more familiar Diplodocus. 

The name means "heavy lizard", an apparent reference to its large dimensions. Paleontologist Othniel C. Marsh named it in 1890. However, its forelimbs were longer and more slender than those of Diplodocus. 

It was a huge dinosaur, but it was not the most intelligent because its head was unusually small and it easily detached from its skeleton after death. In addition, it had probably spent its entire life foraging in the treetops, protected from predators by its large size. According to Mike Taylor, the length of the Barosaurus' neck, estimated at 15 meters long, would have been as tall as a five-story building. 

Barosaurus walked on all fours or quadrupeds. Its columnar limbs were used to support the enormous bulk of the animals. It had long forelimbs, a single carpal bone at the wrist, and the metacarpals were thinner than those of Diplodocus. 

Based on the structure of the cervical vertebrae of Barosaurus, it swept its neck in long arcs at ground level when feeding and could not provide on vegetation high above the ground.

Barosaurus estimated to be over 25-27 meters long, 12 m tall and weighed around 12-20 metric tons.

What did the Barosaurus eat?

Barosaurus was a herbivorous dinosaur that fed entirely on leaves and other plant material.

What does Barosaurus mean?

The name Barosaurus means "heavy lizard", an apparent reference to its large dimensions.

When did the Barosaurus live?

Barosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur that lived 161.2 million years ago - 145 million years ago and is found in the Carnegie Quarry.

How tall is a Barosaurus?

The Barosaurus is estimated to be 12 meters tall. 

How long does a Barosaurus last?

The Barosaurus is estimated to be between 25 and 27 meters long.

How big is a Barosaurus?

Barosaurus is estimated to be 12 to 20 metric tons.

Where did they live?

When did they live?

What was your diet?

Who discovered them?

What kind of dinosaurs are they?

What type of species are they?

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geological time 3

Fun Facts

  • The name Barosaurus means "heavy lizard", an apparent reference to its large size.
  • Barosaurus was a plant-eating dinosaur that fed entirely on leaves and other plant material.
  • Barosaurus walked on all fours or quadrupeds.
  • It was a huge dinosaur but it was not the most intelligent because it had a small head.
  • It was closely related to the more familiar Diplodocus.

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