Allosaurus

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Learn more about the Allosaurus

Quick Facts
NameAllosaurus
Diet
Weight2000 kg
Length12 meters
Height3 meters
Period
Allosaurus
Human

 Allosaurus lived about 156 million years ago during the Late Jurassic. This carnivorous dinosaur lived in semi-arid areas, flat alluvial plains, coniferous and tree fern forests and fern savannas. At the top of their food chain, the Allosaurus was the top predator of all, meaning that they themselves had no predators. 

Allosaurus' sharp teeth made it easy to attack even other large dinosaurs. As an aggressive carnivore, it ate any dinosaur it could find, including Stegosaurus, which also lived in its time. 

Allosaurus had three fingers on their arms to help them tear flesh and walked on two legs and used a long, muscular tail for balance. They are the great-great-grandparents of the T-Rex.

Now we know where T-Rex gets his attitude from. 

Allosaurus comes from the Greek word "allos", which meant different, and "Saurus" which meant lizard. They weighed 2.5 to 5 tons, and 28 to 40 feet long. Allosaurus had a large head, a short neck and a pair of horns on the top of the head. They were fully grown and sexually mature by the age of 15 years. 

These dinosaurs had an average lifespan of 25 to 30 years.

How many teeth did the Allosaurus have?

Allosaurus had D-shaped teeth that eventually narrowed, shortened and became more curved as they grew from the back of the mouth. They had 14-17 teeth that resembled serrations, with jagged edges and were continually shed and replaced.

How was the Allosaurus protected?

The Allosaurus was able to protect itself by being the fearsome and biggest predator of its time. They are the last bullies in the environment that no one dares to fight.

What color was the allosaurus

Great question, colors make it easier for us to imagine an image we have never seen, but in the case of the Allosaurus, no one knows. 

I hear you, it's a little disappointing, but who knows if someone out there is studying the color of the Allosaurus, let's keep waiting.

What does Allosaurus mean?

Allosaurus comes from the Greek word "allos", which meant different, and "Saurus" which meant lizard.

How fast can the Allosaurus run?

According to one study, the Allosaurus can run up to 21 mph, which is pretty good for catching some snacks.

Can the Allosaurus swim?

The Allosaurus throne is not only on land, but also in the waters. Of course, these predators can swim in deeper waters to get some vitamin from the sea.

Where did they live?

When did they live?

What was your diet?

Who discovered them?

What kind of dinosaurs are they?

What type of species are they?

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  • Farlow, James O. (1976). "Speculations about the diet and foraging behavior of large carnivorous dinosaurs". American Midland Naturalist 95 (1): 186-191. doi:10.2307/2424244. 
  • Tanke, Darren H.; and Currie, Philip J. (1998). "Head-biting behavior in theropod dinosaurs: Paleopathological evidence". (pdf). Gaia (15): 167-184. ISSN 0871-5424. Archived since the original January 11, 2006.  The reference uses the obsolete parameter |coauthors= (help)
  • Currie, Philip J. (1999). "Theropods". In Farlow, James; and Brett-Surman, M.K. (eds.), ed. The Complete Dinosaur. Indiana: Indiana University Press. p. 228. ISBN 0253213134. 
  • Roach, Brian T.; and Brinkman, Daniel L. (2007). "A reevaluation of cooperative pack hunting and gregariousness in. Deinonychus antirrhopus and other nonavian theropod dinosaurs". Bulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History 48 (1): 103-138. doi:10.3374/0079-032X(2007)48[103:AROCPH]2.0.CO;2.  The reference uses the obsolete parameter |coauthors= (help)
  • Goodchild Drake, Brandon (2004). "A new specimen of Allosaurus from north-central Wyoming". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 24 (3, Suppl.): 65A. 
  • Bakker, Robert T.; and Bir, Gary (2004). "Dinosaur crime scene investigations: theropod behavior at Como Bluff, Wyoming, and the evolution of birdness". In Currie, Philip J.; Koppelhus, Eva B.; Shugar, Martin A.; and Wright, Joanna L. (eds.), ed. Feathered Dragons: Studies on the Transition from Dinosaurs to Birds.. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. pp. 301-342. ISBN 0-253-34373-9.  The reference uses the obsolete parameter |coauthors= (help)
  • Rothschild, B., Tanke, D. H., and Ford, T. L., 2001, Theropod stress fractures and tendon avulsions as a clue to activity: in: Mesozoic Vertebrate Life, edited by Tanke, D. H., and Carpenter, K., Indiana University Press, p. 331-336.
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  • Lambert, Dinosaur Data Book, p. 299.
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geological time 3

Fun Facts

  • The name Allosaurus means "different lizard".
  • Allosaurs are the largest carnivores during the Late Jurassic; they had large skulls and walked on two legs.
  • Allosaurus is the great-great-grandfather of T-rex; the difference is that Allosaurus had short arms. It had three toes that each had sharp, curved claws.
  • Allosaurus' favorite snack was Stegosaurus.

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