Lambeosaurus

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Quick Facts
NameLambeosaurus
Diet
Weight3000 kilos
Length9 meters
Height2.1 meters
Period
Lambeosaurus
Human

Lambeosaurus was a duck-billed dinosaur that lived about 75 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period of North America. It was a hollow-crested hadrosaur and one of the world's most recognizable dinosaurs. 

Lambeosaurus had an oddly shaped crest on the top of its head that resembled an axe embedded in it. It has been suggested that this hollow portion of the crest produced low frequency sounds for communication between large herds or family members, enhanced its sense of smell, and may have added to its courtship display. The Lambeosaurus crest was probably used as a weapon or as a means of defense against predators. 

Lambeosaurus was robust, with long, sturdy front and hind legs. It had a long tail that served as balance when the animal walked. It was like other hadrosaurs and moved on two legs. All these dinosaurs were thought to live in the water, using their crests as a snorkel or to store air. However, although they were well adapted to water, all hadrosaurs lived on land.

They grew about 9.4 m long, similar in size to Corythosaurus. It was a herbivorous dinosaur that ate pine needles, conifers, ginkgos, seeds, cycads, twigs and magnolia leaves.

Lambeosaurus means "Lambe's reptile" in honor of its discoverer Lawrence Lambe.

What was the purpose of the Lambeosaurus crest?

Lambeosaurus had an oddly shaped crest on the top of its head, suggesting that this hollow portion of the crest could produce low-frequency sounds for communication within large herds or family members, enhance its sense of smell, and/or add to its courtship display. The Lambeosaurus crest was used as a weapon or as a means of defense against predators. 

What does a Lambeosaurus look like?

Lambeosaurus was a duck-billed dinosaur. It had an oddly shaped crest on the top of its head that looked like an axe embedded in it. It had stout, long, sturdy front and hind legs. It had a long tail that served as balance when the animal walked. It could grow to about 9.4 m long, similar in size to Corythosaurus.

What did the Lambeosaurus eat?

It was an herbivorous dinosaur that ate pine needles, conifers, ginkgos, seeds, cycads, twigs and magnolia leaves.

What does Lambeosaurus mean?

Lambeosaurus means "Lambe's reptile" in honor of its discoverer Lawrence Lambe. 

Where did they live?

When did they live?

What was your diet?

Who discovered them?

What kind of dinosaurs are they?

What type of species are they?

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geological time 3

Fun Facts

  • Lambeosaurus was a duck-billed, crested dinosaur.
  • Its crest was shaped like an axe.
  • The Lambeosaurus crest had multiple functions, as it could produce low-frequency sounds to communicate with large herds or family members, enhance their sense of smell, and add to their courtship display. The Lambeosaurus crest was used as a weapon or as a means of defense against predators. 
  • It was closely related to Corythosaurus.
  • There are two verified species of Lambeosaurus: L. lambei and L. magnicristatus.

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