Einiosaurus

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Quick Facts
NameEiniosaurus
Diet
Weight1300 kilos
Length6 meters
Height4.5 meters
Period
Einiosaurus
Human

Einiosaurus was a medium-sized ceratopsian dinosaur that lived in North America approximately 74.5 million years ago and was first discovered in the 1980s in Montana, United States. The name means "Buffalo Lizard," which stands for an American Indian term and a Greek term. Ennio means "bison or buffalo" and "Saurus" means lizard. The remains were discovered by Jack Horner in 1985 and excavated between 1985 and 1989 by field crews from the Museum of the Rockies. There were at least 15 bones of various ages, belonging to old and young individuals.

It was a horned dinosaur or known as a ceratopsian. These animals were "Cretaceous buffaloes" because they lived in large herds. Unlike any other dinosaur, it had an impressive curved horn that was used as a defensive weapon or just for show. According to scientists, the ornament could be colorful for mating or helped individuals recognize others of the same species. However, the frill was unreliable and contained two large holes, the reason why it had not been an effective shield. But thanks to its spines that were used as protection to ward off predators. 

The Einiosaur's forward-curved nose horn made it unique among the others. It had a horny beak and walked on four short, stout legs. It lived in a warm, semi-arid environment and stayed in a shallow lake bed.

Einiosaurus grew to 4.5 in length and weighed 1,300 kg.

What does the name Einiosaurus mean?

The name means "Buffalo Lizard", which means an American Indian term and a Greek term. Ennio means "bison or buffalo" and "Saurus" means lizard. 

When did you discover the Einiosaurus?

The remains were discovered by Jack Horner in 1985 and excavated from 1985 to 1989 by field crews from the Museum of the Rockies.

When did the Einiosaurus live?

Einiosaurus was a medium-sized ceratopsian dinosaur that lived in North America approximately 74.5 million years ago....

What did the Einiosaurus eat?

It was an herbivorous dinosaur that ate grass and some low fruits. 

Where did they live?

When did they live?

What was your diet?

Who discovered them?

What kind of dinosaurs are they?

What type of species are they?

  • Sampson, Scott D. (1995). "Two new horned dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation of Montana; with a phylogenetic analysis of the Centrosaurinae (Ornithischia: Ceratopsidae).". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 15 (4). ISSN 0272-4634, pp. 743-760. Archived since the original on July 15, 2010. 
  • Dodson, P., C.A. Forster, and S.D. Sampson. 2004. "Ceratopsidae" in Weishampel, D.B., P. Dodson, and H. Osmolska (eds.) The Dinosauria. 2nd Edition, University of California Press.
  • Paul, G.S., 2010, The Princeton Field Guide to DinosaursPrinceton University Press p. 262.
  • Rogers, R.R. 1990. "Taphonomy of three dinosaur bone beds in the Upper Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation of northwestern Montana: evidence for drought-related mortality." Palaios 5:394-413.
  • Czerkas, S.J. & Czerkas, S.A., 1990, Dinosaurs. a Global View, Dragons' World, 247 pp
  • Horner, J.R., D.J. Varricchio, and M.J. Goodwin. 1992. "Marine transgressions and the evolution of Cretaceous dinosaurs." Nature 358:59-61.
  • Sampson, S.D. (1995). "Two new horned dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous Two Medicine Formation of Montana; with a phylogenetic analysis of the Centrosaurinae (Ornithischia: Ceratopsidae)". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 15 (4): 743-760. doi:10.1080/02724634.1995.10011259. 
  • Kentaro Chiba; Michael J. Ryan; Federico Fanti; Mark A. Loewen; David C. Evans (2018). "New material and systematic re-evaluation of. Medusaceratops lokii (Dinosauria, Ceratopsidae) from the Judith River Formation (Campanian, Montana)". Journal of Paleontology. in press. doi:10.1017/jpa.2017.62. 
  • Reizner, J., 2010, An ontogenetic series and population histology of the ceratopsid dinosaur Einiosaurus procurvicornis. Montana State University master's thesis, pp 97
  • Lehman, T. M., 2001, Late Cretaceous dinosaur provinciality: In: Mesozoic Vertebrate Life, edited by Tanke, D. H., and Carpenter, K., Indiana University Press, pp. 310-328.
geological time 3

Fun Facts

  • The name means "buffalo lizard".
  • It was a plant-eating dinosaur.
  • It had a forward curved nasal horn that was unique.
  • It was first discovered in the 1980s in Montana, USA. 
  • They lived in herds

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