Brachiosaurus

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Learn more about Brachiosaurus

Quick Facts
NameBrachiosaurus
Diet
Weight52600 kilograms
Length30 meters
Height9.4 meters
Period
Brachiosaurus
Human

The long-necked, long-tailed Brachiosaurus lived 155.7 million to 150.8 million years ago during the middle to late Jurassic period. Despite its enormous size, it was not the largest four-legged dinosaur to walk the earth. Brachiosaurus has been continuously shown in movies and is one of the most famous dinosaurs of the sauropod family, along with Diplodocus and Apatosaurus.

Brachiosaurus had a small head, a relatively short tail, its front legs were longer than its hind legs, and it had a long neck similar to today's giraffes. In 1903, Elmer Riggs first described Brachiosaurus, "the largest known dinosaur" that weighed between 30 and 45 metric tons and was about 26 meters long.

The name Brachiosaurus comes from Greek words meaning "arm" and "lizard". 

Brachiosaurus had a broad snout and thick jaws that housed spoon-shaped teeth, which were ideal for stripping vegetation. Brachiosaurus was indeed a plant eater and loved to chew on green leaves.

Did brachiosaurs live in groups?

Yes, Brachiosaurs lived in herds that regularly changed locations for food supply. 
Perhaps, the Brachiosaurus finds it fun to be with friends on an adventure.

How many teeth did a Brachiosaurus have?

The Brachiosaurus had a total of 52 teeth, 26 teeth in its upper jaw and 26 in its lower jaw. Its teeth were ideal for stripping vegetation.

How long was the neck of a Brachiosaurus?

Brachiosaurus had a neck approximately 9 meters long, perfect for navigating the branches of tall trees.

Why did the Brachiosaurus become extinct?

Brachiosaurus was part of the Triassic-Jurassic (Tr-J) extinction event that profoundly killed life on land and in the oceans.

Could the Brachiosaurus swim?

Brachiosaurus was initially a land animal, but some believe it also spent time in the water. Of course, some scientists do not support that idea because of the shape of its legs that cannot support its body weight in mud.

How big was a brachiosaurus egg?

The ball-shaped Brachiosaurus egg was about 30 cm long, 25 cm wide, had a volume of about 2 liters, and weighed up to 7 kg.

How big was the head of a brachiosaurus?

According to two scientists, Carpenter and Tidwell, the skull measured about 81 centimeters, making it a huge sauropod skull from the Morrison Formation.

Where did they live?

When did they live?

What was your diet?

Who discovered them?

What kind of dinosaurs are they?

What type of species are they?

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geological time 3

Fun Facts

  • The name "Brachiosaurus Lizard Arm" refers to the interesting nature of the Brachiosaurus' legs, which were longer at the front than at the rear.
  • Brachiosaurus had a long giraffe-like neck, a small head and a relatively short tail compared to other sauropods.
  • Brachiosaurus was a herbivore and walked on all four legs.
  • Brachiosaurs are warm-blooded animals, which means they were able to actively control their body temperature.

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