Dryptosaurus

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Quick Facts
NameDryptosaurus
Diet
Weight1500 kilos
Length6.4 meters
Height3 meters
Period
Dryptosaurus
Human

Dryptosaurus was a genus of tyrannosaur that lived in the Cretaceous period and inhabited North America. This carnivorous dinosaur was a large, bipedal, terrestrial creature. In addition, it was the only carnivorous dinosaur on the east coast of the United States based on more than a single bone. Thanks to workers at the West Jersey Marl Company in Gloucester County, New Jersey, who found the partial skeleton more than a hundred years ago in a New Jersey quarry. Believe it or not, it was originally called Laelaps; this name had been given to a spider, so it was renamed Dryptosaurus.

Unfortunately, the only parts of the skull that were unearthed were pieces of the jaws. The shape of its teeth showed that it was a meat-eater like those of a steak knife. This claim was supported by a single huge eight-inch claw; however, it probably had several. The name Dryptosaurus means "tearing lizard" referring to its clawed hands, preferably like eagle claws. 

The hind legs were much longer than the front legs, so it walked on two legs while its tail acted as a balance. The skeleton shows that this creature was about eight feet tall at the hips. It is still hard to say that Dryptosaurus is related to other carnivorous dinosaurs, however it looked a bit like a tyrannosaur. It had long limbs for its size and larger, curved claws on its hands.

Dryptosaurus was estimated to be 7.5 meters long and weighed 1.5 metric tons.

What did Dryptosaurus eat?

Dryptosaurus was a carnivore that ate herbivorous dinosaurs, such as hadrosaurs.

Where were the Dryptosaurus fossils discovered?

Thanks to workers at the West Jersey Marl Company in Gloucester County, New Jersey, who found the partial skeleton more than a hundred years ago in a quarry in New Jersey.

What does the name Dryptosaurus mean?

The name Dryptosaurus means "tearing lizard" referring to its clawed hands, preferably like eagle claws. 

Where did Dryptosaurus live?

Dryptosaurus was a genus of tyrannosaurus that lived in the Cretaceous period and inhabited North America, in what is now New Jersey.

Where did they live?

When did they live?

What was your diet?

Who discovered them?

What kind of dinosaurs are they?

What type of species are they?

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  • Brusatte, S. L. and Benson, R. B. J. and Norell, M. A. (2011) The Anatomy of Dryptosaurus aquilunguis (Dinosauria: Theropoda) and a Review of its Tyrannosauroid Affinities. American Museum Novitates, 3717 . pp. 1-53. ISSN 0003-0082
  • Carpenter, Ken & Russell, Dale A, Donald Baird, and R. Denton (1997). "Redescription of the holotype of Dryptosaurus aquilunguis (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous of New Jersey.". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 17 (3): 561-573. doi:10.1080/02724634.1997.10011003. Archived since the original on March 10, 2007. 
  • E. D. Cope. 1866 [On the remains of a gigantic extinct dinosaur, from the Cretaceous Green Sand of New Jersey]. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 18:275-279.
  • O. C. Marsh. 1877. Notice of a new and gigantic dinosaur. American Journal of Science and Arts 14:87-88.
  • Leidy, J. 1856. Notice of remains of extinct reptiles and fishes discovered by Dr. F. V. Hayden in the badlands of the Judith River, Nebraska Territory. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 8: 72-73.
  • Liddell, Henry George & Robert Scott (1980). A Greek-English Lexicon (Abridged Edition). United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-910207-4.  Unknown parameter |last-author-amp= ignored (help)
  • Cope, E.D., On the genus Laelaps, American Journal of Science, 1868; 2: 415-417.
  • Holtz, T.R. (2004). "Tyrannosauroidea." Pp. 111-136 in Weishampel, Dodson and Osmolska (eds). The Dinosauria (second edition). University of California PressBerkeley.
  • Chan-gyu, Yun (2017). "Teihivenator gen. nov., a new generic name for the Tyrannosauroid Dinosaur "Laelaps" macropus (Cope, 1868; preoccupied by Koch, 1836)". Journal of Zoological And Bioscience Research 4. Archived since the original July 29, 2017. Accessed July 22, 2017.. 
  • Chure, Daniel J. (2001). "On the type and referred material of Laelaps trihedrodon Cope 1877 (Dinosauria: Theropoda).". In Tanke, Darren; and Carpenter, Kenneth (eds.), ed. Mesozoic Vertebrate Life. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. pp. 10-18. ISBN 978-0-253-33907-2. 
  • Russell, D.A. 1970. Tyrannosauroids from the Late Cretaceous of western Canada. National Museum of Natural Science (Ottawa) Publications in Paleontology 1: 1-34.
  • Molnar, R.E. 1990. Problematic Theropoda. In D. B. Weishampel, P. Dodson, and H. Osmólska (editors), The Dinosauria: 306-317. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Gilmore, C.W. 1946. A new carnivorous dinosaur from the Lance Formation of Montana. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections 106: 1-19.
  • Baird, D., and J. Horner. 1979. Cretaceous dinosaurs (Reptilia) of North Carolina. Brimleyana 2: 1-18.
  • Carr, T.D.; Williamson, T.E. & Schwimmer, D.R. (2005). "A new genus and species of tyrannosauroid from the Late Cretaceous (middle Campanian) Demopolis Formation of Alabama". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 25 (1): 119-143. doi:10.1671/0272-4634(2005)025[0119:ANGASO]2.0.CO;2.  Unknown parameter |last-author-amp= ignored (help)
  • Holtz, T.R. 2004. Tyrannosauroidea. In D. B. Weishampel, P. Dodson, and H. Osmólska (editors), The Dinosauria, 2nd ed.: 111-136. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Brusatte, S.L.; Benson, R.B.J. "The systematics of Late Jurassic tyrannosauroids (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from Europe and North America". Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 58: 47-54. 
  • Olsson, R.K. (1960). "Foraminifera of latest Cretaceous and earliest Tertiary age in the New Jersey coastal plain". Journal of Paleontology 34: 1-58. 
  • Olsson, R.K. 1987. Cretaceous stratigraphy of the Atlantic coastal plain, Atlantic highlands of New Jersey. Geological Society of America Centennial Field Guide-Northeastern Section: 87-90.
  • ERVOLINO, BILL (April 13, 2010). "This dinosaur had a Jersey attitude.". THE RECORD. Accessed June 23, 2011. 
geological time 3

Fun Facts

  • The name Dryptosaurus means "tearing lizard" referring to its clawed hands, preferably like eagle claws. 
  • Dryptosaurus was a carnivore that ate herbivorous dinosaurs, such as hadrosaurs.
  • It was known to be the only carnivorous dinosaur on the east coast of the United States.
  • It lived in a terrestrial habitat.
  • It reproduced by laying eggs.

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