Chasmosaurus

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Learn more about Chasmosaurus

Quick Facts
NameChasmosaurus
Diet
Weight3600 kilos
Length5 meters
Height2.5 meters
Period
Chasmosaurus
Human

Chasmosaurus was a genus of ceratopsid dinosaur from Canada in the Cretaceous. The name means "opening lizard," in reference to the large openings in its ornament. In 1898, it was unearthed by Lawrence Lambe along the Red Deer River, Alberta. 

The Chasmosaurus ornament was described as "heart-shaped" because the bone structure was formed by two large "loops" of a central bone. It had injected blood into the area to make the frill more brightly colored to draw attention to its size or as part of a mating display. Despite its large frill, it was weak and had not provided much functional defense nor was it used for temperature control. It had three main horns on the face, one on the nose and two on the brow. 

It was of medium size, similar to its relatives, Triceratops and Sinoceratops. Chasmosaurus had a large skull, four sturdy legs with hoof-like claws, a bulky body and a short, pointed tail. In addition, they hatched from eggs that had been cared for by adults... It moved in herds like the other ceratopsians.

Chasmosaurus was a herbivore; it ate cycads, palms and other prehistoric plants with its hard beak. Its cheek teeth could help it chew plants well. It walked on four short legs. 

Chasmosaurus was a rhinoceros-like dinosaur that was 5 to 8 meters long and weighed about 3220 kg.

What did the Chasmosaurus eat?

Chasmosaurus was a herbivore; it ate cycads, palms and other prehistoric plants with its hard beak.

Where was the Chasmosaurus found?

Chasmosaurus was unearthed by Lawrence Lambe along the Red Deer River, Alberta. 

What does Chasmosaurus mean?

The name Chasmosaurus means "opening lizard", referring to the large openings in its ornament.

When did Chasmosaurus live?

Chasmosaurus was a genus of ceratopsid dinosaur from Canada in the Cretaceous about 83.6 million years ago - 70.6 million years ago. 

What did the Chasmosaurus weigh?

Chasmosaurus was a rhinoceros-like dinosaur that was 5 to 8 meters long and weighed about 3220 kg.

Where did they live?

When did they live?

What was your diet?

Who discovered them?

What kind of dinosaurs are they?

What type of species are they?

  • Ryan, M.J. & Evans, D.C.. (2005). "Ornithischian dinosaurs". In Currie, P.J. & Koppelhus, E.B., eds. Dinosaur Provincial Park: A Spectacular Ecosystem Revealed. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. pp. 312-348.  Unknown parameter |last-author-amp= ignored (help)
  • Paul, G.S., 2010, The Princeton Field Guide to DinosaursPrinceton University Press p. 269-270.
  • Sternberg, C. M. 1925. Integument of Chasmosaurus belli. Canadian Field-Naturalist, 39 , 108-110.
  • Dodson, Peter. "Chasmosaurus. The Age of Dinosaurs. Publications International. pp. 110-111. ISBN 0-7853-0443-6. 
  • Sternberg, C.M., 1925, "Integument of Chasmosaurus belli", Canadian Field-Naturalist 39: 108-110
  • Lambe, L.M., 1902, "New genera and species from the Belly River Series (mid-Cretaceous)", Geological Survey of Canada Contributions to Canadian Palaeontology 3(2): 25-81
  • Lambe, L.M., 1914, "On the forelimb of a carnivorous dinosaur from the Belly River Formation of Alberta, and a new genus of Ceratopsia from the same horizon, with remarks on the integument of some Cretaceous herbivorous dinosaurs", The Ottawa Naturalist 27(10): 129-135
  • Lambe, L.M., 1914, "On Gryposaurus notabilisa new genus and species of trachodont dinosaur from the Belly River Formation of Alberta, with a description of the skull of Chasmosaurus belli", The Ottawa Naturalist 27: 145-155
  • Brown, B., 1933, "A new longhorned Belly River ceratopsian." American Museum Novitates 669: 1-3
  • T.M. Lehman, 1990, "The ceratopsian subfamily Chasmosaurinae: sexual dimorphism and systematics", In: K. Carpenter and P. J. Currie (eds.), Dinosaur Systematics: Perspectives and ApproachesCambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 211-229.
  • Nicholas R. Longrich (2010). "Mojoceratops perifaniaA New Chasmosaurine Ceratopsid from the Late Campanian of Western Canada". Journal of Paleontology 84 (4): 681-694. doi:10.1666/09-114.1. 
  • Campbell, J.A., Ryan, M.J., Holmes, R.B., and Schröder-Adams, C.J. (2016). A Re-Evaluation of the chasmosaurine ceratopsid genus Chasmosaurus (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Dinosaur Park Formation of Western Canada. PLoS ONE, 11(1): e0145805. doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0145805
  • Lull, R.S., 1933, A revision of the Ceratopsia or horned dinosaurs. Memoirs of the Peabody Museum of Natural History 3(3): 1-175
  • Arbour, V. M.; Burns, M. E.; Sissons, R. L. (2009). "A redescription of the ankylosaurid dinosaur. Dyoplosaurus acutosquameus Parks, 1924 (Ornithischia: Ankylosauria) and a revision of the genus". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 29 (4): 1117-1135. doi:10.1671/039.029.0405. 
  • Sternberg, C.M., 1940, "Ceratopsidae from Alberta." Journal of Paleontology 14(5): 468-480
  • Lehman, T.M., 1989, "Chasmosaurus mariscalensissp. nov., a new ceratopsian dinosaur from Texas", Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 9(2): 137-162
  • Lucas SG, Sullivan RM, Hunt AP (2006). "Re-evaluation of Pentaceratops and Chasmosaurus (Ornithischia: Ceratopsidae) in the Upper Cretaceous of the Western Interior". New Mex Mus. Nat. Hist. Sci. Bull. 35: 367-370. 
  • R.B. Holmes, C.A. ForsterM.J. Ryan and K.M. Shepherd, 2001, "A new species of Chasmosaurus (Dinosauria: Ceratopsia) from the Dinosaur Park Formation of southern Alberta", Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 38: 1423-1438
  • Scott D. Sampson; Mark A. Loewen; Andrew A. Farke; Eric M. Roberts; Catherine A. Forster; Joshua A. Smith; Alan L. Titus (2010). Smith; Alan L. Titus (2010). "New Horned Dinosaurs from Utah Provide Evidence for Intracontinental Dinosaur Endemism.". PLoS ONE 5 (9): e12292. PMC 2929175. PMID 20877459. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0012292. 
  • Paul, G.S., 1987, "The science and art of reconstructing the life appearance of dinosaurs and their relatives: a rigorous how-to guide", pp 4-49 in: Dinosaurs Past and Present Volume IINatural History Museum of Los Angeles County
  • Olshevsky, G. 2000. An Annotated Checklist of Dinosaur Species by Continent. George Olshevsky, Publications Requiring Research, San Diego, 157 pp.
  • Maidment, S.C.R., and Barrett, P.M., 2011, "A new specimen of. Chasmosaurus belli (Ornithischia: Ceratopsidae), a revision of the genus, and the utility of postcrania in the taxonomy and systematics of ceratopsid dinosaur", Zootaxa, 2963: 1-47
  • L.M. Lambe, 1915, "On Eoceratops canadensisgen. nov., with remarks on other genera of Cretaceous horned dinosaurs", Canada Geological Survey Museum Bulletin 12, Geological Series 24: 1-49
  • "L A F A U N A". Archived since the original on July 25, 2009. 
  • Sternberg, C.M., 1927, "Horned dinosaur group in the National Museum of Canada", Canadian Field-Naturalist 41: 67-73
  • http://www.nbcnews.com/science/rare-baby-dinosaur-skeleton-unearthed-canada-2D11650637
  • http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160114113643.htm
geological time 3

Fun Facts

  • Chasmosaurus was unearthed by Lawrence Lambe along the Red Deer River, Alberta. 
  • The name Chasmosaurus means "opening lizard", referring to the large openings in its ornament.
  • Chasmosaurus was a herbivore.
  • The flower of Chasmosaurus was described as "heart-shaped".
  • It moved in herds like other ceratopsians.

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