Camptosaurus

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Quick Facts
NameCamptosaurus
Diet
Weight2500 kilos
Length5 meters
Height2 meters
Period
Camptosaurus
Human

Camptosaurus was a genus of beaked ornithischian dinosaurs that lived from the Late Jurassic period, 161.2 million to 145.5 million years ago, to the Early Cretaceous period, 145.5 million to 99.6 million years ago. This dinosaur lived in North America, and possibly also in Europe.

Camptosaurus had a small thumb instead of the conical spike developed in Iguanodon. It had the characteristic "locked" wrist that facilitated progression on all fours. It was prehensile and may have grasped vegetation while feeding. Its hand was prehensile and may have grasped vegetation while feeding. The skull was about 15 inches long, low and massive. It had long rows of broad, leaf-shaped teeth that appeared to be adapted for feeding on plants. It had a large number of teeth in its mouth and chewed a lot to process its food properly.

Camptosaurus had one powerfully built leg and walked on two or four legs. In addition, it went on all four to graze for low plants. The toes were not attached and had a very dexterous movement. 

It was a heavy Ornithischian dinosaur that could reach 5-7 m long, 1 m high at the hips and weighed approximately 1000 kg.

When did the Camptosaurus live?

Camptosaurus was a genus of ornithischian, beaked dinosaurs that lived from the Late Jurassic period, 161.2 million to 145.5 million years ago, to the Early Cretaceous period, 145.5 million to 99.6 million years ago.

What did the Camptosaurus eat?

Camptosaurus was a genus of ornithophagous, beaked dinosaurs that grazed on low plants or ate fibrous vegetation.

Where was the Camptosaurus found?

Camptosaurus was first found by dinosaur collector Earl Douglass and named by paleontologist Othniel C. Marsh in 1885 in Utah, USA.

What does Camptosaurus mean?

The name Camptosaurus means "flexible lizard," which refers to the presumed flexibility of this dinosaur's spine.

Where did they live?

When did they live?

What was your diet?

Who discovered them?

What kind of dinosaurs are they?

What type of species are they?

  • Marsh, O.C. (1879). "Notice of new Jurassic reptiles". American Journal of Science and Arts 18: 501-505. 
  • Cope, E.D; (1878); "Descriptions of new extinct Vertebrata from the Upper Tertiary and Dakota Formations", Bulletin of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories 4(2): 379-396
  • Cope, E.D.; (1878); "On the Vertebrata of the Dakota Epoch of Colorado", Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 17(100): 233-247
  • Marsh, O.C. (1894). "The typical Ornithopoda of the American Jurassic". American Journal of Science. 3 48: 85-90. 
  • Gilmore, C.W. (1909). "Osteology of the Jurassic reptile. Camptosauruswith a revision of the species of the genus, and descriptions of two new species". Proceedings of the United States National Museum 36: 197-332. 
  • Galton, P.M. and Powell, H.P. (1980). "The ornithischian dinosaur. Camptosaurus prestwichii from the Upper Jurassic of England". Palaeontology 23: 411-443. 
  • Carpenter, K. and Wilson, Y. (2008). "A new species of Camptosaurus (Ornithopoda: Dinosauria) from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Dinosaur National Monument, Utah, and a biomechanical analysis of its forelimb." Annals of the Carnegie Museum 76: 227-263. 
  • Erickson, Bruce R. (2003). Dinosaurs of the Science Museum of Minnesota. St. Paul, Minnesota: The Science Museum of Minnesota. p. 33. ISBN 978-0-911338-54-6. 
  • Foster, J. (2007). "Camptosaurus dispar." Jurassic West: The Dinosaurs of the Morrison Formation and Their World. Indiana University Press. p. 219-221.
  • Paul, G.S., 2010, The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs, Princeton University Press p. 284
  • Marsh, O.C. (1885). "Names of extinct reptiles". American Journal of Science 29: 169. 
  • Bakker, R.T. (1998). "Dinosaur mid-life crisis: the Jurassic-Cretaceous transition in Wyoming and Colorado". In Lucas, S.G., Kirkland, J.I. & Estep, J.W. (eds), ed. Lower and Middle Cretaceous Terrestrial Ecosystems 14. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. pp. 67-77. 
  • Foster, J. (2007). "Appendix." Jurassic West: The Dinosaurs of the Morrison Formation and Their World. Indiana University Press. pp. 327-329.
  • Brill, K. and K. Carpenter (2007). "A description of a new ornithopod from the Lytle Member of the Purgatoire Formation (Lower Cretaceous) and a reassessment of the skull of Camptosaurus". In Carpenter, Kenneth (ed.), ed. Horns and Beaks: Ceratopsian and Ornithopod Dinosaurs. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. pp. 49-67. ISBN 0-253-34817-X. 
  • McDonald, A.T.; Kirkland, J.I.; DeBlieux, D.D.; Madsen, S.K.; Cavin, J.; Milner, A.R.C.; Panzarin, L. (2010). "New Basal Iguanodonts from the Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah and the Evolution of Thumb-Spiked Dinosaurs.". PLoS ONE 5 (11): e14075. PMC 2989904. PMID 21124919. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0014075. 
  • Andrew T. McDonald (2011). "The taxonomy of species assigned to Camptosaurus (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda)". Zootaxa 2783: 52-68. 
  • Sachs, S. and Hornung, J.J. (2006). "Juvenile ornithopod (Dinosauria: Rhabdodontidae) remains from the Upper Cretaceous (Lower Campanian, Gosau Group) of Muthmannsdorf (Lower Austria)". Geobios 39: 415-425. doi:10.1016/j.geobios.2005.01.003. 
  • Galton, Peter M. (2009). "Notes on Neocomian (Late Cretaceous) ornithopod dinosaurs from England - Hypsilophodon, Valdosaurus, "Camptosaurus", "Iguanodon" - and referred specimens from Romania and elsewhere". Revue de Paléobiologie 28 (1): 211-273. 
  • Ruiz-Omeñaca, José Ignacio; Pereda Suberbiola, Xabier; Galton, Peter M. (2007). "Callovosaurus leedsithe earliest dryosaurid dinosaur (Ornithischia: Euornithopoda) from the Middle Jurassic of England". In Carpenter, Kenneth (ed.), ed. Horns and Beaks: Ceratopsian and Ornithopod Dinosaurs. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. pp. 3-16. ISBN 0-253-34817-X. 
  • Norman D.B. and Barrett, P.M. 2002. Ornithischian dinosaurs from the Lower Cretaceous (Berriasian) of England. Palaeontology 68:161-189
  • McDonald, A.T., Kirkland, J.I., DeBlieux, D.D., Madsen, S.K., Cavin, J., Milner, A.R.C. and Panzarin, L. (2010). "New Basal Iguanodonts from the Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah and the Evolution of Thumb-Spiked Dinosaurs.". PLoS ONE 5 (11): e14075. PMC 2989904. PMID 21124919. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0014075. 
geological time 3

Fun Facts

  • The name Camptosaurus means "flexible lizard".
  • He walked on two or four legs.
  • He lived in what is now known as Europe and North America.
  • Camptosaurus was first discovered on September 4, 1879 by William Harlow Reed. 
  • They traveled in large herds to protect themselves from predators.

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